Teens and Privacy: Where Do You Draw The Line?

The Challenges of Social Media

Teens are a challenge and a half. I’m just wandering into the pool of those challenges- most of them weren’t even on my radar until recently.

Everyone needs privacy. We need our space from others, physically and emotionally. We need our own space to grow and express thoughts. Teens need this for many reasons, one of the biggest being that they are trying to figure themselves out.

What Our Parents Didn’t Worry About

In the age of technology, privacy can get a bit worrisome. Parents have a lot more to worry about now than our parents did. We have to worry about Instagram and other social site pictures being too revealing and suggestive. We have to worry about our kids being bullied, because that ends tragically far too often. We worry about our kids being targeted while they play video games. These are just a few things that our parents never had to think about.

Black and white computer pic

Talking to Your Children

Opening up a conversation about privacy can be a bit awkward. It’s hard to start the conversation without being weird- you may have to look for an opening.

Do you already have an open relationship with your child? If you do, this may be a bit easier. If not, you may have to do a little more work to ease into it.

Go to my Freebie Page and find some helpful tips for talking to your kids. They require careful steps but in the end, everyone will be glad for the talk.

What if my child won’t talk or let me see what I ask for?

This is a rough one. Some kids aren’t talkers. I’ve got a couple. I’m not saying just let the quieter kids be- because they still need to know the importance of opening up and respecting this request. Losing their privilege can be a huge incentive to give you the information you want.

Assure your child that they can come to you if they are scared. That may be all they need.

There are some great apps for keeping an eye on what your kids do online- I use Net Nanny and it is super simple. It’s free and sends me a weekly summary of anything blocked or warned due to something the kids shouldn’t have looked up or sites they don’t need to be on. They also know about this and that they will lose all privileges if I get anything from this page.

As of this post, nothing has ever popped up in the whole time I have had this installed. We share a YouTube account and I can see everything they look up on Google.

I’m not a fan of breaking and entering into your child’s room. I don’t recommend this at all, except in one condition. That condition is if you are certain your child is in imminent danger and/or there is illegal activity involved. By all means, break down the door and go for it. This also applies for self-harm and other mental health reasons.

I’m hoping that I never have to sneak in my kids’ room and go through their things. I hope we are able to talk through things and come to a solution first.

What are your thoughts?

Twin Mummy and Daddy

Bringing up Georgia
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15 thoughts on “Teens and Privacy: Where Do You Draw The Line?

  1. jessicacmckenna says:

    This is so great! I had never heard of Net Nanny before and will be looking into this for sure. I still have some time (I hope) before I have to worry too much about this but it’s so valuable to be well informed and prepared for when this is needed in our home! Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. diynige says:

    What an awkward situation always difficult to tell where really interesting read Thank you for linking to #Thatfridaylinky please come back next week

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Tracey Bowden (@frazzledmumblog) says:

    We’re not at the stage of my tween locking her door to me yet, although I’m sure we’re not far away, there is so much to worry about and keep an eye on. I’ve not used net nanny before but will keep it in mind. Currently I have full access to passwords and accounts and her phone and check it regularly as does her dad #fortheloveofblog

    Liked by 1 person

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