A Parent’s Guide to Screen-Free Activities

It seems as if our kids were born with the ability to work a tablet, computer and/or phone.

Or is it just my kids?

It’s a well-known fact that most kids are very attached to anything with a screen and a keyboard, so I’ll spare all of us the research. The question is, how do we get our kids AWAY from the screen?

*pause*

*crickets*

Sigh

There’s Fun Beyond The Screen

I promise there is.

Our kids might not see this, especially if they’re teens and love Netflix, but there’s really a whole world out there. I have a kid on the autism spectrum, so this is double the fun.

Tips for getting your child off the screen:

  • Have another, more fun, activity lined up. This one is pretty obvious. It’s a clear winner at my house. Know your kid- what do they like? What is something you know will interest them for a couple hours (or however long) to keep them off the screen and engaged? Try something new, you never know what might get their minds going. At my house, this includes nerf guns, parks, walks and simply telling Julian to ride his bike.
  • Find apps with built-in timers. Some apps have these and automatically shut off after a certain amount of time and then the fun part- making sure your kid doesn’t go straight into another app.
  • Find a stopping point. This works wonderfully with kids who do not do well with interruptions or transitions. If you can have them stop at a certain episode, level or other points, it may be easier for them to stop. It can be super frustrating to have to stop in the middle of something.
  • Discuss consequences and follow through. Every parent knows that kids need consequences. If your child doesn’t follow through with your rules on not stopping, limits, etc., then it is time for a consequence.
  • Try limiting your own screen time. Look at how much time you spend on your phone/tablet.
  • Ban electronics at mealtimes. Some families allow electronics at the dinner table, which limits conversation at the main time of the day that everyone is together.

A note for parents of kids with autism: This can be a special kind of challenge because some kids use iPads to communicate, some behaviors can be stopped (short-term) by handing the child a device, and it can also be used as a reinforcer for good behavior.

Also, some kids with autism are great with computers. You may have to get outside assistance to modify the behaviors your child has, depending on the severity. This information is from Psych Central

Alternatives to The Screen

This is where the fun comes in- what can kids do besides play or watch things on a screen?

Plenty. Here are some ideas.

  • Read a book
  • Draw/color (there are SO MANY awesome coloring books out there)
  • Painting rocks (check out Pinterest)
  • Go through old clothes/toys to donate
  • Take a walk, go for a run, ride a bike
  • Picking apples, other fruits
  • Plant a garden
  • Birdwatching
  • Learn a new skill/hobby
  • Watch the clouds

It can be hard to put down the screen at first, but the memories you make as a family are definitely worth it.

Do you have any activities to add? List them in the comments!

Pics courtesy of unsplash

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